Patterns of folk embroidery from Poland

What some of you might already know, I love to stitch in my free time. It feels amazingly relaxing to see the patterns coming to life. I collect various materials about traditional Polish folk embroidery; recently I decided to reorganize them and came upon an idea of creating a set of patterns which I could share with you.

Personally, I love the cross-stitch technique and therefore chose examples of Polish embroidery in this particular technique for the set of patterns, with a few examples which can be transcribed into the cross-stitch.

I’m adding a few patterns below for a start, and have much more just waiting to be reedited and prepared for publishing here. This is a growing collection and this article will be definitely updated many times. If you’d like to use some other Polish patterns in your projects, make sure to visit this article again in the future to check whether something new appeared at the bottom.

Those of you who want to learn more about Polish folk costumes I can invite to take a look at the educational gallery I run at polishcostumes.tumblr.com (with a growing list of regional Polish folk costumes). Each pattern below is described with a name of a place in Poland it comes from, and the name links to a proper tag in the gallery in order to show you the traditional costumes from the region and to give you an idea of how the embroidery is used in them.

Side note: if you’re going to share or use the patterns, all I’m asking for is to link back to my blog ♥ Please do not crop the images in any way!

Enjoy :)


Polish embroidery from Zamość. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Zamość is a town in south-eastern Poland.

The rows of motifs can be used separately. For this pattern I used two charts found in the website wiano.eu as a reference:
Polish embroidery from Zamość. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com


Polish embroidery from Krzczonów. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Krzczonów is a village in eastern Poland, near Lublin.

I ‘decoded’ this pattern from an old piece of embroidery found in the website patternsofeurope.pl:

Polish embroidery from Krzczonów. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com


Polish embroidery from Jurgów. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Jurgów is a small village located in region of Spisz, southern Poland. The region of Spisz is stretching between Poland and Slovakia.

I retraced the pattern from an old chart found in wiano.eu:


Polish embroidery from Opoczno. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Opoczno is a town and cultural region in central Poland.

I retraced this pattern from these materials found in wiano.eu:

Polish embroidery from Opoczno. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

 


Polish embroidery from Krzczonów. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Second pattern from Krzczonów (the other’s under No.002).

Below’s the original picture I used as a reference, found  also in patternsofeurope.pl:

Polish embroidery from Krzczonów. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com


Polish embroidery from Włodawa. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Włodawa is a small town on Polish-Belarusian border, located quite close to a point where Polish, Belarusian and Ukrainian borders meet together.

For this pattern I used a photo of old embroidery made in a different technique, but wanted to convert this motif into a cross-stitch project. Here’s the original piece I used as reference, found in patternsofeurope.pl:

Polish embroidery from Włodawa. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com


Polish embroidery from Opoczno. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Another pattern from Opoczno (other’s under No.004).

It’s based on a few various patterns, and the rows of the motifs can be used separately or mixed in a different order. I based the patterns on archival photos found in the book “Strój opoczyński / Atlas Polskich Strojów Ludowych”, 1956. I changed the pattern with flowers slightly, on the basis of other similar examples from Opoczno:

Polish embroidery from Opoczno. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com


Polish embroidery from Zamość. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

Second pattern from Zamość (other under No.001).

This is one of patterns redrawn from booklet “Tradycyjny haft ludowy w stroju zamojskim” by Elżbieta Piskorz-Branekova published online by Zamość Museum:


Polish embroidery from Beskid Śląski. See more at lamusdworski.wordpress.com

These three rows of patterns are from the region of Beskid Śląski (in English: Silesian Beskids), mountainous region in southern Poland bordering the Czech Republic.

It’s based on illustrations included in the album “Polski Haft Ludowy” by Jadwiga Turska (also released in English as “Polish Folk Embroidery”).


 More to come – stay tuned! :)

In the meantime you can visit my other blogs:

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